As much fun as it can be to take your dog along for outings or even on a trip, its safety comes first. And this applies not only during the journey, but also before and after. For dog owners, there are a few things to keep in mind when driving with your dog. Here you can find out exactly what they are.

Open the door, put the dog in and drive off? It's easy, but in practice it's not a good idea - at least not until you've taken a few precautions. When transporting your dog, you should always play it safe. First of all, despite all the Hollywood romance, don't take your dog in the passenger seat.

It is safer for your dog on the back seat or in the boot. The simplest and cheapest option is to put a harness on your dog and fasten it with a special belt. This way, your four-legged friend can travel safely with you, strapped in. It is just as simple and inexpensive to place the dog in the boot. The partition grids above the rear seat bench then provide the necessary safety.

If you want an even safer option for your dog, transport boxes are a good alternative. Whether this makes sense on the rear seat depends on the size of your dog and the fastening options. For small dogs, you can fasten the transport box on the back seat with the belt. Larger dogs often do not fit into a box on the back seat, but require a metal transport box in the boot. SUVs in particular offer the necessary space.

Such boxes have many advantages: In the event of an accident, the dog cannot be thrown through the car and it is protected from the force of a colliding car. In addition, the dog cannot escape and does not hinder the rescue services. By the way, with Carvolution cars it is no problem to take dogs with you and put a transport box in the boot.

How to get your dog used to driving a car

To ensure that your dog is not overwhelmed by the situation of driving and the dog crate itself, you must first get him used to it. He should get to know the box as a safe and comfortable den. To do this, equip it with lots of blankets and toys and leave it at home for the time being. As soon as he likes it at home, put it in the car. With lots of praise and treats, you can get him excited about the car ride in the box. It is best to start with short distances. The goal should be something pleasant, such as new, exciting walks, a visit to your best dog friend, etc. If you don't want to put your dog in a car, you can give him a few treats. If you don't want to transport your dog in a box, but strap him in on the back seat, then show him that too. It is best to have someone sitting next to him at the beginning to check the hold and comfort of the seat belt during the ride and whether your dog is comfortable. If the harness cuts in or the dog is thrown around in the car at every bend, then it will soon no longer be fun for your dog.

Especially in the beginning, you should avoid taking your dog to the vet, because otherwise it can evoke negative associations with driving. It is also a good idea to let your dog drive on an empty stomach to avoid nausea. The intake of sufficient water is also important. If the dog is safely in a box in the car, make sure that fresh air can flow into the box. And one more thing: even though the internet is full of pictures and videos of dogs with their heads sticking out of open windows, you should avoid this. It can lead to eye injuries and inflammation. And of course, it also makes transporting the dog in the car less safe.

How long can you leave the dog in the car?

You should also pay attention to the temperature. In general, it is safe to leave your own dog in the car for a maximum of five minutes if the outside temperature is above freezing or below 20 degrees Celsius. This is because even on a mild day with temperatures around 20 degrees Celsius, the temperature in the car can quickly rise to over 45 degrees or more. Most of this heat rise occurs within just 30 minutes. And dogs can suffer heat stroke when their body temperature reaches 40 degrees. Opening a window and parking in the shade make little difference, by the way. The problem is that cars are temperature conductors. Even in the shade and with the windows down, cars conduct and amplify the outside temperature. So it doesn't have to be hot outside for the inside to be unbearably hot. If you have a passenger in the car, you should ask them to stay in the car with your dog and leave the air conditioning running. Otherwise, just take your dog with you when you go to a restaurant, for example.

Breaks and exercise

Remember to take breaks every now and then when driving with your dog, even during the night. It is recommended to take a short walk every two hours. Of course, this varies from dog to dog. Some animals need a break from driving earlier, others sleep so soundly that they can drive longer distances. If you take a break, it's best to walk with your dog for a bit so he can get some exercise. Then you can load your dog back into the car.

Cars that are suitable for dogs

It depends on how big or small your dog is. For small dogs that fit in a carrier in the back seat, for example, the Skoda Fabia is an ideal car. This is a small car with 5 seats. This means that the back seat is big enough for a small transport box to be strapped in with the seatbelt. The Ford Focus is also a good choice. The compact car is somewhat larger, including the interior, and offers enough space. If you have a large dog that feels more comfortable in a transport box in the boot, then the Skoda Octavia estate or the Mercedes Benz C-Class are ideal. If you prefer an SUV, the Volvo XC60 or the Audi Q5 are good options. These cars have a large back seat as well as a large boot.

Under this link you will find a selection of all our vehicles, whether small car, compact, estate or SUV,

As you can see, there is a wide range of cars that you can use to transport your dog. So nothing stands in the way of your next adventure with your dog.

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